Mini-Guide: Sims 4

LQ: 9.6

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Brain grade: 9.6
Fun score: 9.6

Sims 4
Game Type: ESRB Rating: Teen Platform/Console: , , LWK Recommended Age: 13+ Thinking Skills Used: ,

PC  |  PlayStation 4  |  Xbox One

Sims 4 is the most recent version of the classic simulation game. The player creates a character, including looks, personality, and even aspirations. This is their Sim. They then build a house and get a job for their Sim. 

Once the player has started the “life” of their Sim, it is their responsibility to keep their Sim functioning and healthy. They must tell the Sim to go to the bathroom, eat, and sleep. They must also make and maintain friendships, as well as studying to increase skills and advance the Sim in their career.

EA Arts, the makers of the Sims 4, also has a large variety of expansion packs and downloadable content. They offer things like a pets expansion, which lets the player give their Sims pets—but then requires them to take care of and train them, just like they do the Sims.

The ESRB rated Sims 4 T for Teen due to crude humor, sexual themes, and violence.


Sims 4 helps kids practice and improve the following skills:

Self-AwarenessSims 4

Understanding our own actions, thoughts and feelings.

The player’s Sim acts as a stand in for the player. Every time the player has to think about what the Sim needs, they are practicing self-assessment and analysis. The relationships they have to build for the Sim also give them the chance to practice their social skills and being empathetic—what would that other Sim be interested in? What would they like? If the player doesn’t use these self-awareness skills, their Sim will become unhappy and not advance in life and the player will run out of money.

Self-Control

Managing our actions, feelings and behaviors.

This game also allows the player to practice self-control skills. The player has to think about the future when they are determining which needs to meet for the Sim, as well as which skills to improve and what money to spend. They also have to practice impulse control. If they spend all their time advancing a skill for a Sim because they want to advance the career and earn more money, the needs of the Sim won’t get met and they will become unhappy. If the player spends all their money on that fancy bed, they won’t have money left to buy food. Finally, some of the times the Sim may do what they want on their own or will be too hungry or tired to do what the player wants. This can be frustrating. If the player doesn’t control their anger and frustration, they can make silly mistakes that slow down their progress.

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