Singing the Right Tune for Kids with Slow Processing Speed

The most important attributes of teachers of kids with slow processing speed are patience and a supportive attitude. Keeping the kids upbeat and working hard can be a challenge. What better way to do this than singing some songs, humming a tune, or listening to music? Music and rhythms put people in a good mood, and research suggests they might also help kids with slow processing speed to find their pace. Here are a few song  suggestions for teachers of kids with slow processing speed:

“It’s Gonna Take a Little Bit Longer” This is an old Charlie Pride song about love, but it also pertains to kids with slow processing speed. Give these kids more time to respond orally to questions, make choices, and finish their work.

“You Deserve a Break Today” A riff on “Old McDonald’s Farm,” this also applies to kids with slow processing speed, who benefit from breaks during intense school work and tests. Reduce writing demands by using true/false formats or multiple choice tests.

“Won’t You Stay Just a Little Bit Longer” A Jackson Browne song that is also pertinent for kids with slow processing speed, who can benefit from time and a half for exams and un-timed tests.

“I Heard It Through the Grapevine” Ok, this is a reach, but you know the song, no matter your age. Kids with slow processing speed benefit from hearing directions repeatedly and slowly and from hearing about the materials they will need to complete assignments on more than one occasion.

“Lean On Me” This Bill Withers song (for those of you old enough to remember) speaks to the importance of having someone’s back. Children benefit from support in keeping a growth mindset, regardless of the amount of work they have completed. Kids with slow processing speed who feel a connection with their teachers are able to put forth the sustained effort needed for success.

 

 

Featured image: Flickr user Camera Eye Photography

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