Is ADHD a learning disability?

Is ADHD a learning disability? It is not uncommon to be confused. However, while some children diagnosed with ADHD experience
significant difficulties with learning, there are many others affected by ADHD who do not display any specific learning disabilities but still struggle with many aspects of school. For example, more than 50% of children with ADHD will experience some difficulties with writing skills. Many children with ADHD will perform at or above grade levels in elementary school but begin to struggle when the demands of multiple classrooms and longer-term projects become the norm in middle and high school. Fortunately, early identification of ADHD can facilitate helpful strategies and accommodations for a child in the school setting.

Here are some of our favorite websites that provide specific strategies about ADHD in the classroom:

Smart Kids provides an extensive list of educational planning resources, like tips for writing an Individualized Education Program (IEP). They also inform parents about assistive technology and how it can help children with ADHD and learning disabilities.

Inside ADHD offers extensive resources for school children with ADHD. Their articles range from strategies for homework success to motivation. Additionally, they provide tool kits (separated by grade) that offer resources such as homework evaluations to improve academic performance. provides a variety of extremely useful tips on how to help children with ADHD receive the services they need to succeed in school. They also feature comprehensive information on learning skills (writing, coordination, etc.) and their age expectations.

The Help Guide is a nonprofit resource equipped with methods on how to help your child manage their ADHD symptoms while in school. This site also includes tips specifically for parents on how to effectively partner and communicate with teachers in order to directly affect the child’s experience in the classroom.

North Shore Pediatric Therapy’s website has many informative articles and provides advice on how parents can prepare their child’s teacher for working with an ADHD student. Included in these resources are useful blog posts on topics like early school strategies and teacher consultation.

The Wrightslaw Way is an amazing resource that advocates for children with disabilities. They provide detailed information on how and why a child with ADHD qualifies for an IEP or 504 plan.


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